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they are teaching. when you have a tragedy as bad as connecticut, the teachers on top of the parents have also lost a child. i had two teachers in elementary schools. the security there is as much as the security is going to get in the school. when you look at schools and said, this is the safest place to be. for it to happen in an elementary school, the first school you enter as a child, that is devastating. when you see the parents crying and upset, you have to rush back to your child's school because there has been this devastating event happened. host: you are an educator in baltimore and we are showing the front page of "the baltimore sun." talk to us about the security of your school. what does a person have to do to get into the school during the school day? caller: you have to be bused in, you go to the office to get a pass. the office personnel are not equipped to handle a gunman coming through the door. even if you take the precaution of having the doors locked and going through the office first, there is no security in the office. there is no security guard. you just sign in and say what
of the horrific shooting in newtown, connecticut, on friday, it was impossible for me not to react not just as a senator, but as a parent, as a father. and as my wife and i spent the weekend reflecting on the heartbreaks loss of 20 innocent children and 6 of their teachers and faculty, as we talked to our own three young children about what had happened, we thought about the grief, the anguish. a whole range of different parents deeply touched by this tragic incident. the first, of course, are the parents who lost their precious, innocent children. their six- and seven-year olds in the massacre at sandy hook elementary school last friday. parents like joel and joann baker who lost their precocious outgoing red-haired daughter charlotte just six years old. joann recently bought charlotte a holiday dress in her favorite color -- pink -- and a pair of white boots. charlotte begged and begged to wear her new outfit early and on friday, december 14, the last day of charlotte's young life, her mother joann agreed. or parents like steve and rebecca kowalski, who lost their son chase. two days befo
. >> people across the country, we just heard from the mayor of bridgeport, connecticut, a few minutes ago, a lot of folks trying to get guns off the streets right now. two rocket launchers were part of the 2,000 guns that were part of the buyback a few days ago. is that a better method than putting more guns in tnoticein schools? >> i doubt the rocket launchers are legal right now. the best solution would be to have a police officer in each school. and we have had a program like that for many years. it's called school resource officers, they not only help protect against violence, but they teach a course or two in police work in leadership. they make friends with the kids that are there every day. >> what about the cost of that? what about the cost of that? >> that's the problem, we only had it in perhaps 10% of the schools and when the fiscal crisis hit in 2008, the legislatu legislature had to cut back from that. so it's in a small percentage of the schools. so my proposal is second best. the preference is to have the school resource officers in the schools, that would be the best solut
york city, for instance. >> dave: new jersey, connecticut. >> clayton: you're not living the dream. >> juliet: it's sort of subjective. well, actually not subjective you can look exactly at what people live here for 250 or people in san francisco, another expensive city, it doesn't go that long, didn't go that far. >> dave: the bottom line, it appears they've moved the goal post and it may be around the $400,000 mark and that may be the new 250 if you will. may be where ne get the deal done. and upwards towards the 500 mark, but here are two congressmen on perhaps moving this up. >> the $400,000 level seems to me to be about right, that represents about the top 1% of the income earners, the people who got 93% of the income growth our last year and that seems to be enough, but i think there's some flexibility there. >> it's about making sure that we can live within our means and address the real problem and that's spending. i kind of feel like i'm a lifeguard and we've got to save as many people from drowning in higher taxes as we can. >> clayton: that seems to be the new threshold
principle detection. there are lawsuits for misuse of a weapon. there are a lot of state laws. connecticut had about the toughest laws possible. connecticut had very tough laws . apparently the killer was turned down to buy a rifle because of the background checked. his mother had an arsenal at home. people should be liable if they miss use a weapon. people have these concealed carry weapons. host: democratic caller. caller: i have a couple things here. the fact is that the weapons tingsin the school shoo were bought legally. i have nothing against the so- called assault weapons. i am against the 30-round c lips. it could take two-hand acation instead of just -- two-hand action instead of just one. the amount of recoil is controlled by the power that is put through the shell from the high velocity power. i think there's some things there. even the senator from "meet the press" said there should have been some way to interrupt the shooter. host: we got your point. guest: in this article that i recommend to everybody, he comes out for restrictions in gun shows and the winning period, backgro
to satisfactory. it is a long step of healing for the people in newtown, connecticut. all of the flowers and letters and photoin new ton will be soil and blocks to be used in a foundation of a future memorial. it was senator daniel inouyhe's last wish. for colleen handbusa to be. >> i made the appointment for the state of schatz is flying to washington with president obama he is expected to be sworn in later. those are the headlines for you. >> clayton: we'll talk the scal cliff. today is the twenth. a few days left for congress and the president to get their act together. the president took a red eye flight back from hawaii. why did congress and the president go on raication at all. >> yeah, we all go to work. >> there is nothing on the table . kelley. >> a lot of people feel they are left in the lurch by the president and congress. and they didn't get the job done . here's what we are facing. we are teetering on the edge of the fiscal cliff. there are many members in congress who disaagree raising of tax. the president had gone up to $400,000 when house speaker boehner would raise the
senate, the attorney general of the state of connecticut, elected to the united states senate four times, a vice-presidential nominee in the year 2000, a candidate for president, and i should probably add nearly a nominee for vice president again. that he managed to achieve such prominence while being the least partisan politician i know is a credit to his character and to the exemplary quality of his public service and to the public's too often frustrated desire for leaders who seek office to do something, not just to be someone. he has been a tireless advocate for the rights of the oppressed, the misfortuneate, the disenfranchised. tireless, too, in his concern for the security of the united states, for the strength of our alliances, the excellence of our armed forces and the general progress of our values. he came here to do justice, to love mercy and to walk humbly with his god. it's hard to find anyone here who doesn't like and admire joe. he's impossible to dislike, even if you only know him a little. most of his detractors seem to be people who don't know him and who tend to view
senator from connecticut, my dear friend, senator joe lieberman. when joe lieberman announced early last year that he would not seek reelection to the senate, he called himself a lucky guy for having had the opportunity to serve his state and his country. i would contend that it is we in this chamber and the people throughout connecticut and across our nation who are the ones who are truly fortunate, for joe lieberman's life long commitment to public service, including his 24 years here in the senate. for more than a decade it has been my privilege to serve with joe as the leaders of the senate homeland security and governmental affairs committee. regardless of who has been chairman and who has been ranking member, ours has been a partnership. and indeed, mr. president, i'll never forget when i was losing the chairmanship because of the change in control, joe leaning over to me and saying "don't worry, susan. all that will change is that you'll pass me the gavel." it was typical of his thoughtfulness and generosity. and it is not coincidental, mr. president, that ours is the only committ
interviews to the economy former member of congress from connecticut and i am the president of the united states capitol and historical society. this interview with senator daniel inouye is part of a special series featuring asian-pacific members of congress. in these interviews current and fellow members have relived their memories of people, places and events that have shaped their public career. it is our hope that these recollections will provide listeners with a deeper appreciation prehuman dimension of representative government in this temple of liberty we know as the united states capitol. senator daniel inouye was born in honolulu hawaii on september 7th, 1924 and was named after a methodist minister who had adopted his mother. in march, 1943, he enlisted in the u.s. army's 44 regimental a team. he saw combat in italy and southern france and was badly wounded during an engagement for which he was awarded the distinguished service cross which was later upgraded to the medal of honor, the highest award for military valor. with financial assistance from the g.i. bill, inouye graduate
Search Results 0 to 8 of about 9